YouTube's new deals could bolster its music streaming service

YouTube's new deals could bolster its music streaming service

YouTube's new deals could bolster its music streaming service

Music labels and publishers have spent much of 2017 wondering what Facebook's plans were for licensing music. "Music lovers, artists, and writers will all be right at home as we open up creativity, connection, and innovation through music and video". Eventually, the functionality of the agreement will expand across other social features, including Messenger, with users being able to access a vast library of music. In what's been quite the long-time coming for the social network, Facebook has signed its first-ever deal for music rights with a record label. Users can easily opt to watch music videos on YouTube for free, potentially making it more hard to convert some of its users into paying Remix subscribers. Nonetheless, with companies like Magic Leap partnering with Sigor Rós on audio/visual experiences, it's clear that the upcoming mixed-reality revolution is ripe for giving music a new dimension. Financial terms weren't disclosed, though its likely UMG was the beneficiary of a whopping advance.

The partnership, he adds, is "an important first step demonstrating that innovation and fair compensation for music creators are mutually reinforcing - they thrive together". There is also speculation that this could bolster Facebook's attempts to get further into the video market with high-end video content. The deal will also include Instagram and Oculus.

Health officials: 6 Oklahomans have died from the flu this season
During the 2016-2017 flu season, state officials say there were 56 flu-related deaths and more than 800 hospitalizations. Masks must be donned when there are two or more laboratory-confirmed, unrelated influenza cases in the county.

Over the past few years, Facebook has been more aggressive with removing videos with copy-written music, but this could allow the rules to be slightly more lax while having UMG taking a cut of ad revenue.

And the big question - the reason music rightsholders are genuinely excited about Facebook going deeper on music, beyond any big cheques being waved at them - is what can Facebook do that *isn't* just another $9.99-a-month music-streaming service with or without a free tier? Seeing this as "Facebook strikes deal to make its own Spotify" is missing the bigger opportunity, but it's very early days.

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