Net neutrality protests, coming to a Verizon store near you this Thursday

Trump's FCC chair shuts down celebrities pushing net neutrality conspiracy theory

Public Interest Groups Urge FCC Chairman to Delay Net Neutrality Vote to Dismantle Rules

But when asked recently about New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's investigation into the public's comments to the FCC about net neutrality, a spokesman for Pai told SiliconBeat pushed back.

He also called on the FCC to delay a planned December 14 vote on chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to roll back numerous existing rules, which now ban internet providers from blocking or throttling traffic, or from selling "fast lanes" so content providers can reach consumers more quickly.

South Dakota Senator John Thune says he is hearing about it....

Although Schneiderman said he has received more than 3,200 complaints, including 350 in NY, from those who say comments were made in their or a relative's name without their consent, the FCC is refusing to provide any records or data to help with the investigation. "So I call on my colleagues to halt this vote until we get to the bottom of what has happened with these stolen identities and the quality of our public record", said Rosenworcel, who was nominated by President Barack Obama to the FCC. The Democratic commissioners are against Pai's plan to roll back net neutrality rules.

Furthermore, protests have been planned throughout the nation over the coming days in opposition to the FCC's "scorched-earth" attack on net neutrality: More than 600 demonstrations are scheduled to take place at Verizon stores and congressional offices across the country on Thursday, exactly one week ahead of the FCC's planned vote. Schneiderman added that the feedback system was "corrupted" - a fact that he accuses the FCC of being well aware of.

Woods finishes strong with final-round 68 at Hero
He had another eagle putt on the par-5 11th, and generally looks like powerful-ass Tiger friggin' Woods out there. He definitely had the Albany course figured over the first nine holes on Sunday.

Citing the findings of Schneiderman's office and other researchers, the senators wrote, "These reports raise serious concerns as to whether the record the FCC is now relying on has been tampered with and merits the full attention of, and investigation by, the FCC before votes on this item are cast". According to the sources, Chairman Pai's staff had expressed concern that any attempt to block fraudulent comments would result in accusations that Pai was trying to censor net neutrality advocates.

Despite a wealth of support for net neutrality and millions of people denouncing this plan, the FCC decided that they would still move forward. By Monday, Schneiderman said, they had received more than 3,000 responses - including, he said, from a man who said his deceased mother's name had been used. Without additional information about the alleged anomalies surrounding the public record, the FCC can not conduct a thorough and fair evaluation of the public's views on this topic, and should not move forward with a vote on December 14, 2017. Unlike legislative votes in Congress, concerned citizens don't have a local senator to complain to, and the FCC's comment process has left a lot to be desired.

"One of the arguments is the government shouldn't get involved in the Internet", said Anthony Martino, director of Northeast Cyber Security and Forensic Center at Utica College.

A group of senators, led by Maggie Hassan (D-NH), said the same thing in a letter sent to FCC chairman Ajit Pai.

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